We are your professional source
for all your medical supplies and homecare needs
(Your shopping cart is empty)
You are here: Home > Medical Glossary > Foot Conditions > Calluses
A callus is an especially toughened area of skin which has become relatively thick and hard in response to repeated friction, pressure or other irritation. Rubbing that is too frequent or forceful will cause blisters rather than allow calluses to form. Since repeated contact is required, calluses are most often found on feet because of frequent walking.
Shoes can produce corns by rubbing against the top of the toes or foot. Continued irritation may cause pain. Stretching out the shoe to reduce rubbing may reduce the contact and alleviate the pain, but the corn may remain. If a toenail or a fingernail rubs against the skin, pinching it between surfaces for a period of time, a corn can form at the edge of the nail. These corns are difficult to treat because the nail is frequently the primary cause.
Corns and calluses are easier to prevent than to treat. When it is not desirable to form a callus, minimizing rubbing and pressure will prevent callus formation. Footwear should be properly fitted and broken in, gloves may be worn, and protective pads, rings or skin dressings may be used. People with poor circulation or sensation should check their skin often for signs of rubbing and irritation so they can minimize any damage.
Calluses and corns may go away by themselves eventually, once the irritation is consistently avoided. They may also be dissolved with keratolytic agents containing salicylic acid, for example, sanded down with a pumice stone, or pared down by a medical professional such as a podiatrist.
The information contained on the DiabestMedical.com website is provided for your general information only. DiabestMedical.com under no circumstances recommends particular treatment for specific individuals and in all cases recommends that you consult your physician or local treatment center before pursuing any course of treatment.
www.diabestmedical.com

 
 About Us
 Become an Affiliate
 Privacy Policy
 Send Us Feedback